MAGNITUDE AND FEATURES OF SCRUB TYPHUS AND SPOTTED FEVER IN CHILDREN IN INDIA
Somashekar H.R*, Prabhakar D. Moses**, Sreeja Pavithran***, Elizabeth Mathai****, Didier Raoult*****, Jean Marc Rolain******
Department of a Child health, Christian Medical Collage and Hospital, Vellore 632004, Tamilnadu, India. *, Department of a Child health, Christian Medical Collage and Hospital, Vellore 632004, Tamilnadu, India. **, Department of a Child health, Christian Medical Collage and Hospital, Vellore 632004, Tamilnadu, India. ***, Department of a Child health, Christian Medical Collage and Hospital, Vellore 632004, Tamilnadu, India. ****, Department of a Child health, Christian Medical Collage and Hospital, Vellore 632004, Tamilnadu, India. *****, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical Collage and Hospital, Vellore 632004, Tamilnadu, India. ******
Abstract
Objectives:
To determine the proportion of rickettsial infections among the children admitted with acute febrile illness. Design: Prospective and descriptive study. Setting: Child health department of Christian Medical Collage, a tertiary care hospital. Subjects: 180 children up to the age of 14 years with fever of 5 to 30 days duration. Methods: Those children who did not have specific diagnosis after routine work up for fever were screened for rickettsial infections. The clinical and laboratory profile of children who tested positive for rickettsial infections were recorded and frequency of various clinical manifestations were calculated. Results: Overall 43 (24%) among 180 children admitted with acute febrile illness in whom other common causes for fever were excluded, were clinically and serologically confirmed to have scrub typhus or other rickettsial infections. Scrub typhus formed the largest group (62.8%) followed by spotted fever (32.6%) and endemic typhus fever (4.7%). Liver involvement occurred in 58% with scrub typhus, where as rash was a predominant manifestation of spotted fever (86%). Twenty-two children given doxycycline became afebrile by 24 hours as well as two children who received chloramphenicol. One child with spotted fever given doxycycline did not respond but improved with chloramphenicol. Two children (4.7%) one each with spotted fever and scrub typhus died; both of them received chloramphenicol. Conclusions: These data suggest that rickettsial infections have re-emerged in India and contribute significantly to acute febrile illnesses in children. This emphasizes the need for effective control measures.

Keywords:
Children, India, Rickettsial, Scrub typhus, Spotted fever
How to Cite URL :
H.R S, Moses D P, Pavithran S, Mathai E, Raoult D, Rolain M J.. Available From : http://www.pediatriconcall.com/fordoctor/ Conference_abstracts/report.aspx?reportid=56
Disclaimer: The information given by www.pediatriconcall.com is provided by medical and paramedical & Health providers voluntarily for display & is meant only for informational purpose. The site does not guarantee the accuracy or authenticity of the information. Use of any information is solely at the user's own risk. The appearance of advertisement or product information in the various section in the website does not constitute an endorsement or approval by Pediatric Oncall of the quality or value of the said product or of claims made by its manufacturer.
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.