Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine – Adverse Events - Immunization
 
CHICKENPOX OR VARICELLA VACCINE
Last Updated : 2/1/2016
Sayenna Uduman
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Adverse Events
Varicella vaccine is safe; reactions generally are mild and occur with an overall frequency of approximately 5% to 35%. In approximately 3% to 5% of immunized children a generalized maculopspular rather than vesicular rash appears usually 1 – 3 weeks after immunization without fever . A slightly increased risk of febrile seizures is associated with the higher likelihood of fever following the first dose of MMRV compared with MMR and monovalent varicella

Breakthrough Disease
Is defined as varicella disease in a child who had been vaccinated 42 day or more before the onset of a rash. Although breakthrough varicella is generally milder e.g., involves fewer maculo popular lesions, low grade & shorter duration of fever than natural varicella, it is still a cause for concern . Vaccine recipients with varicella breakthrough disease are rarely contagious , typically experience a faster recovery and have no risk for complications.

Herpes Zoster after varicella immunization
Risk of herpes zoster is lower among immunocompetent children immunized with varicella vaccine than among children who have had natural varicella infection.

Transmission of Vaccine-Strain VZV
Vaccine-strain VZV transmission to contacts is rare and the documented risk of transmission exists only if the immunized person develops a rash. However, some experts believe that immunocompromised people in whom skin lesions develop, possibly related to vaccine virus, should receive acyclovir or valacyclovir treatment. Attempts to confirm the presence of VZV by laboratory means, particularly by PCR assay, should be made in these patients.
Acceptable evidence of immunity to varicella for the purpose of school / college enrolment & etc includes any of the following:
1. Documentation of age-appropriate immunization. (a) Preschool-aged children (ie, =12 months of age): 1 dose . b) School-aged children, adolescents, and adults: 2 doses 2. Laboratory evidence of immunity or confirmation of varicella disease. 3. Diagnosis, or verification of a history, of varicella disease by a health-care provider. (Parental reports are no longer acceptable without further evaluation) 4.History of herpes zoster diagnosed by a physician.

References

Contributor Information and Disclosures

Sayenna Uduman
Sayenna A Uduman MD, FAAP
Visiting Professor, Infection Control Committee & ID Division of the KIMS
Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India


First Created : 1/3/2001
Last Updated : 2/1/2016

References

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