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An infant with vomiting and increased thirst
An infant with vomiting and increased thirst 02/05/2009 https://www.pediatriconcall.com/Journal/images/journal_cover.jpg
Dr Ira Shah.
Medical Services Department, Pediatric Oncall, Mumbai.

Cite this article  Copy Citation
Shah I. An infant with vomiting and increased thirst. Pediatr Oncall J. 2008;5: 79.

Address for Correspondence
Medical Sciences Department, Pediatric Oncall, Mumbai

Clinical Problem :
A 10 month old boy born of third degree consanguineous marriage presented with fever and vomiting since 1 month. He had hard stools and increased thirst. He was a full term delivery. He is on exclusive breast feeds. Milestones are normal. He was shown a pediatrician at age of 7 months and treated with intramuscular vitamin D (6, 00,000 units) and calcium supplements. He has been immunized till date. On examination, he was afebrile, and systems were normal.
 
Question :
What is the diagnosis?
 
Expert Opinion :
Expert’s opinion: - Dr. Ira Shah
This child had fever and vomiting with increased thirst since past 1 month. He also had hard stools suggestive of decreased fluid in the body. Thus, there seems to be water depletion in the child. With no history obtainable of polyuria, it may become necessary to rule out other sources of loss of water. There is no increased sweating or GI losses to attribute to the water loss. The vomiting may lead to losses but the child is also drinking adequately. The fever may also lead to water losses but dehydration may itself be the cause of fever. So one has to determine why the child is getting dehydrated and why is he vomiting. Though there is no history of polyuria, in a small infant it may not be forth coming. Since the child has received high dose of vitamin D, without any evidence of rickets, hypervitaminosis D should be ruled out. Hypercalcemia can lead to failure to thrive, polyuria, polydipsia and vomiting. In this child, the investigations showed serum calcium to be 14.9 mg/dl, 25 (OH) Vitamin D3 level to be > 150 ng/ml and ionic calcium to be 2.38 mEq/L. Treatment of Hypercalcemia should be fluid diuresis, steroids and even bisphosphonates.
 
Funding:  None  
 
Conflict of Interest: None
 
DOI No. : 
 
Cite this article as :
Shah I. An infant with vomiting and increased thirst. Pediatr Oncall J. 2008;5: 79.
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